As of the November 2016 election, 29 states and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis either medically or totally (i.e., you can smoke for whatever reason you want if you’re an adult aged 21 or over). However, since marijuana remains federally illegal, there is no universal standard dictating how much cannabis someone can buy.  To make things easier for you, here are the rules for each state.

How Much you Can Buy Per State

Alaska

Legalization status: Personal and medical use

How much can you buy: Up to 1 ounce

Arizona

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical marijuana patient/caregiver card, up to 2.5 ounces every two weeks

Arkansas

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: Arkansas is still hammering out its rules.  Once they are finalized, you will be able to find them here.

California

Legalization status: Personal and medical use

How much can you buy: Tricky question.  Recreational dispensaries How much pot can you buy, legal state breakdownprobably won’t be open until 2018, so technically, you can only purchase cannabis from a medical dispensary until then. Adults can “gift” marijuana to their friends, so anyone can possess up to 1 ounce of cannabis.  With a medical marijuana card, Californians can buy up to 8 ounces.

Colorado

Legalization status: Personal and medical use

How much can you buy: Up to 28 grams in a single transaction

Connecticut

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: Patients who possess a medical marijuana card can purchase the amount necessary to treat their condition for a month as determined by their doctors.

Delaware

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, up to three ounces every 14 days

Florida

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: In Florida, an ordering physician inputs the patient’s information into the Compassionate Use Registry where the patient or his/her caretaker can then fill the order.

A qualified, ordering physician can order up to 45 days worth of cannabis to treat the patient according to the physician’s judgement

Hawaii

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, up to four ounces every 15 days or up to eight ounces every 30 days

Illinois

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis every 14 days

Maine

Legalization status: Personal and medical use

How much can you buy: Up to 2.5 ounces

Maryland

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: Medical marijuana patients are allowed to possess up to 30 days worth of cannabis, but there are no legal outlets to purchase the plant.  The Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission has stated that cannabis will be available from dispensaries mid-to-late summer 2017.

Massachusetts

Legalization status: Personal and medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, patients are allowed to possess up to 60 days worth of cannabis as determined by their physician.

Adults who are not patients can possess up to one ounce of flower, but dispensaries are not yet open for recreational users

Michigan

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, up to 2.5 ounces

Minnesota

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: The amount determined by a pharmacist.  However, at this time, there are no open medical dispensaries.

Montana

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, up to 1 ounce

Nevada

Legalization status: Medical and recreational use

How much can you buy: Medical marijuana users can purchase up to  2.5 ounces within two weeks, and recreational users can purchase up to 1 ounce of flower and up to 1/8 ounce of concentrate

New Hampshire

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, up to 2 ounces

New Jersey

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card and physician’s approval, a maximum of 2 ounces in 30 days

New Mexico

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, up to 6 ounces

New York

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, patients can purchase up to 30 days’ worth of non-smokeable cannabis.

North Dakota

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, patients can purchase up to 30 days’ worth of cannabis for their condition as determined by the Department of Health.

Ohio

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, up to six ounces every three months

Oregon

Legalization status: Personal and medical use

How much can you buy: Medical patients can purchase up to 24 ounces.  Other adults can possess up to one ounce of dried flower, one ounce of concentrates, 16 ounces of solid edibles, and 72 ounces of cannabis infused beverages.

Pennsylvania

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: There is no legal outlet to purchase the cannabis since Pennsylvania has not yet licensed any dispensaries, and it isn’t clear what the limits will be once it has.

Rhode Island

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, up to 2.5 ounces

Vermont

Legalization status: Medical (though recreational marijuana is likely to be legalized in the very near future)

How much can you buy: With a medical card, up to 2 ounces

Washington

Legalization status: how much legal pot can you buyPersonal and medical use

How much can you buy: It depends on the product.  You can purchase up to an ounce of flower, 7 grams of extract, 16 ounces of edibles or 72 ounces of a cannabis beverage, or 16 ounces of solid topicals or 72 ounces of liquid topicals.

Washington, D.C.

Legalization status: Personal and medical use

How much can you buy: Up to 2 ounces.  However, there are no recreational dispensaries yet open.

This means that medical card holders are the only ones who can legally purchase cannabis from a dispensary

West Virginia

Legalization status: Medical use

How much can you buy: With a medical card, up to 30 days worth of cannabis, likely determined by a physician.

Dianna Benjamin

About the author: Dianna Benjamin is a freelance writer, teacher, wife, and mom horrified and fascinated by social justice and our inability--yet constant pursuit--to get it right.